BROWN COUNTY, OHIO

OHGenWeb Project

Biographies

E

EARHART, John

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

John Earhart was born October 11, 1777 in the State of Pennsylvania, came here in the spring of 1815 and purchased the farm on which he ever afterward lived, located southwest of Locust Ridge, now the property of George F. Mayer, and present residence of Lyndia Thompson. Although Mr. Earhart spent much of his time on his farm tilling the soil, he was a cooper by trade, he died in February, 1851 and was laid to rest in the little family graveyard on the farm. His sons--Adam, David, John and William--are still living, Adam and William being present residents of the township. The former was born in Lancaster County, Penn.; came with his father to Ohio when a boy not yet four years old, he is now sevety-one and has always made farming his occupation. William was born five years after his father settled at the old home and, like his father, is a cooper by trade.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 556-557.

EARLY, Andrew

submitted by Carl Early

Andrew Early, the older son of David Early, was born in Fleming county, Kentucky, December 14, 1803, near Flemingsburg, and reared on a farm. Began teaching school when a young man and was very successful. On April 18, 1826, he married Fannie L. Summers, in Fleming county, Kentucky, who was one of the many Summers' families which lived in that section of the State, and were noted for their thrift, enterprise and hospitality.

Soon after marriage he moved to Brown county, Ohio, near Feesburg, where he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land in the woods, but by hard work he cleared off the timber, and he and his wife worked hard, used good economy, and stuck to it until the farm was paid for.

To them were born six children, as follows:

Mary Ellen Early, born September 30, 1827; died August 29, 1828.

Amanda Jane Early, born March 3, 1829, and died February 16, 1849, nearly twenty years of age. She was an example of a pure christian character, always at her place in the church, unless sick, and was an active worker in all christian duties.

David Carr Early, born April 21, 1830.

Lewis Jefferson Early, born October 11, 1831.

Elnathan Kemper Early, born June 11, 1834.

George Washington Early, born June 26, 1836.

Andrew Early and his wife were members of the New School Presbyterian Church, as they believed in human liberty and opposed to slavery, although both of their parents had been slave holders in Kentucky. He was almost continuously an elder in the church, and was very able in prayer. Was also a good speaker and took an active part in Republican politics, to which party he belonged after the Whig party ceased to exist.

He was a lover of his country and believed in holding aloft the flag of his country, and when troops were called for to go to Mexico he went to Georgetown, where they were to volunteer; he went to offer his services to the governor, but the county quoto was filled when he got there, which prevented him being in the war with Mexico.

He was a justice of the Peace in his township. He lived in Peace with all his neighbors and was always ready to help the poor and needy. He lived a pure life and was a strong advocate of temperance, and during his long life never used tobacco (in any form) or profane language. Was never sick until his last sickness, when he died of fever June 7, 1878, and was buried by the side of his wife who died August 9, 1874.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 5-6.

EARLY, Charles Lee

submitted by Carl Early

Charles Lee Early left his paternal home in 1876, and located in Sac City, Sac county, Iowa. He had taught several terms of school in Brown and Adams counties, Ohio, before going west. He taught one term in Sac county, Iowa, and then secured a position in the Sac county bank, where he remained two years. He then was deputy County Treasurer four years. Then engaged in the real estate business under the firm name of Schaller & Early for several years. During this time he had been elected to various town and township offices. In 1888 was elected Clerk of the District Court for Sac county and re-elected a member of the Twenty-fifth General Assembly of the State of Iowa. Has been a member of the Order of Free and Accepted Masons since 1878. Has held the principal and nearly all the subordinate offices in Lodge, Chapter and Commandery, of which he is a member.

He is a young man not yet in the prime of life, of pleasing address, a good education, able in argument, a clear mind, quick of perception, thorough in his methods and practical in all his doings. He investigates for himself all the questions of the day, and when his mind is fully made up he is found to be right, and is able and willing to defend his position. As a legislator he makes an able and useful member. As a citizen he is honored and respected by all who know him. He is kind, affable and public-spirited, and always ready and willing to perform a chief part in any public enterprise or undertaking. Though yet a young man, he has already acquired, by frugality and industry, quite a competence of this world's property. A high degree of usefulness is yet in store for him. He was married June 28, 1888, to Agnes Waddell, and has two daughters—

Ruth Imogene, born October 25, 1890.

Sarah Esther, born November 23, 1893.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 34-35.

EARLY, David

submitted by Carl Early

David Early, the fourth son of Thomas, the only son of William, the younger brother of Jeremiah Early, the first of the family to emigrate from Ireland to America, was born in Hampshire county, Virginia, in the year 1774. He came to Mason county, Kentucky, with other members of the family in the year 1788. He was then fourteen years of age. He was without means other than a robust constitution, great courage and a determination to make a home in that then new and romantic country. He was an expert with the ax and worked at chopping and hewing timber, and was termed a house joiner—that is, one who cut and hewed logs and joined them together into a house. He grew to manhood in the vicinity of Mills Station. He was more than sixe feet tall, large bone and frame, and very muscular, with a strong, rugged constitution. He often said he did not consider it a hard day's work to cut the timber and split two hundred rails, but it certainly would have kept the great rail splitter, Abraham Lincoln, quite busy to have done more.

He was a good marksman and killed many bears and buffalo, they being plentiful in the forest when he first came to Kentucky. He often spoke of being well acquainted with Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton, who were pioneers in that part of Kentucky.

He married Elizabeth Linn, daughter of Andrew Linn, who came to Kentucky from Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and they had issue:

Sallie, born February 14, 1802.

Andrew, born December 14, 1803.

Elenor, born April 26, 1806.

Euphemia, born July 31, 1808.

Elizabeth, born August 6, 1811.

Martha, born March 26, 1814.

Amanda, born March 30, 1817.

David Watson, born July 6, 1820.

By hard work and frugality he had accumulated enough money to purchase a small farm at the time he was married, upon which he and his young wife commenced their young lives together in Fleming county, Kentucky, to which they added as time went on until they had acquired 185 acres of splendid land. He farmed it nicely and kept it in good repair; worked moderately, but steadily. Bought a negro man, who afterwards married, and he then bought the wife. The colored pair had several children living in 1836 when he sold his farm in Kentucky and moved to Ohio. At that time he gave the negro man and wife their freedom and took the small negro boy (Lew Johnson by name) with him to Ohio and kept him in his family until twenty-one years of age. The colored boy was quite a curiosity in his Ohio home. He attended school, church and singing schools and afforded a greal deal of amusement for the white folks, young and old. He had his own horse and had as much liberty and fun as the white boys in that part of the country. When he was twenty-one he was given $100 and allowed to go and do for himself.

David Early sold his farm in Kentucky and bought a farm of about 200 acres in Brown county, Ohio, about six miles north of Aberdeen, and moved there with all his family except Sally, Andrew, Euphemia and Elenor, they having married in Kentucky. He prospered in Ohio and added to his farm as the years went on until he had accumulated more than six hundred acres of good land and five thousand dollars in good notes at the time of his death, all of which had been acquired by honest toil and judicious management.

He died August 2, 1862, at the age of 88. His wife died a year or so before. He had lived an honest, upright life and was honored and respected by all who knew him; saw his children grow to maturity, marry and rear families on their own, and nothing came to cloud or mar his life until the separation by death from the companion of his life, who had long before passed the allotment, "three score and ten." If all lives could be as pure and simple and prosperous as those of David and Elizabeth Early, what a glorious world this would be.

He was a soldier in the war of 1813; helped to build Fort Defiance and wintered there; suffered a great deal on account of the cold winter and exposure, which was a great strain on his wonderful constitution. On his return, was sick nearly unto death and was ever afterwards subject to attacks like pneumonia, which resulted finally in sudden death.

He received a land warrant for eighty acres of land for his services. He became a christian about the year 1846 or 1847 and he and his wife united with the Presbyterian Church, and during the remainder of his life was a model christian, maintaining family prayers and a regular attendant at church.

His wife was of a splendid family and was a lovable and helpful companion during all her life.

They lie at rest in the Ebenezer church yard cemetery, which is on a portion of the old Ohio homestead.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 1-4.

EARLY, David Watson

submitted by Carl Early

David Watson Early, the youngest son of David Early, was born in Fleming conty, Kentucky, July 6, 1820, and moved with his father, David, to Brown county, Ohio, in 1836, and there grew to manhood. Married Sarah Jane Hook when he was about twenty-eight years of age and began housekeeping in a part of his father's house, but soon erected a log house on a part of the paternal farm, of which he later became owner. On the death of his father, he bought the old homestead and has lived there ever since, being now seventy-five years of age. He is much like his father in size and appearance, six feet two inches tall, large bone and frame, but not corpulent, his weight being from 190 to 200 pounds. He is a man of great moderation, a devoted christian, a member of the Methodist church, in which he has been an active worker for the last thirty-five years. During a great deal of this time he has been superintendent of the Sun day schools at Ebenezer church.

He was a school teacher when young, but soon gave up that profession, and has since devoted his entire time to the farm. He has been successful, having added to his original farm until he now has about 400 acres of land. For a number of years he has done but little work other than to keep the farm in good repair. Spends a great deal of his time in reading the Bible and studying the Sunday school lessons. His life has been upright, strictly honest and honorable. He "owes no man anything" and looks the whole world in the face. He has never used an ounce of tobacco nor a pint of liquor nor profaned the name of God. He has been respected and honored and loved by all with whom he came in contact, has lived happily, and is now patiently waiting for his summons to join his companion, who died October 22, 1884. His married life was a model one. He was a devoted husband, she a loving, gentle and dutiful wife. They were blessed with all the humble comforts of life and enjoyed a long and happy union. It would be hard to find two lives more pure than those of David Watson Early and wife.

The fruits of their union are:

John Quincy, born December 30, 1849.

Walter David, born October 25, 1851.

Charles Lee, born July 27, 1854.

George Andrew, born September 21, 1856, and twin boys that died in infancy.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 32-34.

EARLY, George Andrew

submitted by Carl Early

George Andrew Early, the fourth son of David Watson, is married and lives in the old homestead in Brown county, Ohio, with his father. He married Sena Lawwill, and they have one daughter—Retta May, born December 6, 1893.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 36.

EARLY, John Quincy

submitted by Carl Early

John Quincy Early is married to Lucy E. Fulton, and lives in the log house which his father built and lived in until 1862. Before he married he taught school during the winter for several years, but since has given his attention to farming.

His issue are:

Charles Mason, born June 10, 1881.

Lula Blanch, born July 15, 1883.

Bessie, born August 12, 1885.

Maude, born June 24, 1887.

Nellie, born April 16, 1893, and died November 4, 1894.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 34.

EARLY, Walter David

submitted by Carl Early

Walter David Early lives on a part of the farm of his father. Is married to Elnora Kropper and has issue:

William Watson, born March 10, 1874.

Minnie Alice, born December 27, 1875.

Charles Stacy, born April 14, 1878.

Walter Francis, born October 13, 1889.

He was elected in 1894 as member of the Board of County Commissioners of Adams county, Ohio.

Some Biographical Sketches of David Early and His Descendants (Columbus, OH: Mann Adair Printing, 1896), 34.

EDWARDS, Orange

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

Orange Edwards, retired farmer, P.O. Ripley. James Edwards was the grandfather of our subject. He was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland. He came to America previous to the Revolutionary war, in which four of his sons served on the side of liberty. His wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Jacobs, also of Scotland. They raised a family of twelve children, all of whom lived to be men and women. In 1794, James entered Kenton Station, near Maysville, Ky., near which he purchased a farm. He joined his son at Aberdeen, where he purchased one thousand acres of land and laid out that town, naming it after his birthplace in Scotland. He died at the age of ninety-nine years. Orange Edwards was born in Byrd Township October 3, 1819, and is the son of George and Susannah (Downing) Edwards, both natives of Virginia. Orange Edwards, whose name appears at the head of this article, received a thorough education at the schools of Georgetown in Brown County. He was a scholar in the same class with Gen. U.S. Grant. After the completion of his studies, he engaged in teaching school for some three years. In 1855, he formed a partnership with John Coslett in the milling business near Ripley. Ten years afterward, he disposed of his mill interest and returned to his farm in Union Township. During the war of the rebellion, Mr. Edwards served as Colonel of the home organization for the protection of the border, and was a Presidential Elector on the election of President Hayes. He was married, in 1842, to Miss Catharine La Favre; from this union there were eight children; four of them living, as follows: William H., who received an appointment and served six or seven years in the Treasury Department at Washington D.C.; Charles M. is a practicing lawyer at Cincinnati. Leander A. and George W. are both living at home. Mr. Edwards lost his wife by death in 1860. He was married again in 1862 to Miss Mary, daughter of Robert McMillen, a native of Ripley, this county.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 61.

EDWARDS, William H.H. of Byrd Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

William H.H. Edwards, farmer, P.O. Russellville, next to the youngest son of Darias and Jane Edwards, was born in Byrd Township July 17, 1840. October 10, 1861, he rallied to his country's call, and enlisted in Company A, Seventieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He took part in the following engagements: Shiloh Corinth, Vicksburg, LaGrange, Jackson and Lookout Mountain. He veteranized, and January 5, 1864, re-enlisted in the same company, and went on Sherman's long and toilsome march to the sea. He fought in all the battles up to Statesboro, Ga., where he, with fifteen others, were captured. He was confined in Florence prison three months till March, 1865, when he was paroled. He was honorably discharged June 15, 1865. He was married December 24, 1869, to Miss Lizzie T. Spears, a daughter of Spencer Spears. Three children were given to bless this union—Spencer D., Arthur E. and Archie H. (twins). Mr. and Mrs. Edwards are members of the Christian Church. He owns a good farm of 120 acres.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 302.

EICHLER, Frederick of Perry Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Frederick Eichler, physician, Fayetteville, son of Peter and Madalena (Long) Eichler, was born in Prussia, August 4, 1828. He studied in the high schools of Treves till seventeen years old, then studied pharmacy four years. He then took to the study of medicine and graduated from Bonn University in 1853. He was married in 1856, and came to this country the same year and settled in Danville, Highland Co., Ohio, where he practiced three years. In 1859, he came to this village, where he has since enjoyed a good practice. He owns his residence, office and two lots. Mr. and Mrs. Eichler have two children—Henrietta and Julius F. Mr. Eichler is a member of the Brown County Medical Society.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 135.

ELLIS, Amos

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

Amos Ellis was among the first to settle in the western part of Union Township. His wife was Mary McConnell. They were orginally from Pennsylvania. In 1822, Amos Ellis was appointed County Treasurer, and the following year was elected to the same office. He was also elected a member of the Legislature in 1803 and again in 1809. He died in 1832 at the age of sixty-two years. His wife survived him seventeen years.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 415.

ELLIS, G.L. of Pleasant Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

G.L. Ellis, Recorder of Brown County, Georgetown, was born at Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, December 13, 1850. His grandfather, Noah Ellis, was a native of Virginia, and came to Ohio when a boy. He was a farmer of Brown County till his death, in his seventieth year. Mr. Ellis' father is John E. Ellis, also a native of this county, and at present, a farmer of Pleasant Township. His mother was Mary Wright, a native of this county, and a daughter of John Wright, also a native of Virginia. Mrs. Ellis is also living. Our subject was reared on a farm, and when fourteen years of age, was taken with a severe attack of intermittent fever, and white swelling, from which he was a constant sufferer for three years. During this period, he lived in a darkened room, seeing the light of day but very little. His disease prostrated him to such an extent, that on two occasions he was supposed to be dead, and his grave ordered dug by his father. Upon final recovery, he was too weak to do any labor for the succeeding three years. He then attended school, and subsequently taught steadily for six years, attending school in the spring months. On September 11, 1879, he married Clara A. Snedaker, a native of Feesburg, Lewis Township, this county. Mr. Ellis has been a Democrat through life, and in October, 1881, was elected Recorder of Brown County. He took possession of his office January 2, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Ellis had one daughter born to them, now deceased.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 12-13.

ELLIS, George M.

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

George M. Ellis, farmer, P.O. Higginsport, was born in Pleasant Township, March 15, 1828. He is the son of Samuel and Sally (Ellis) Ellis. Though bearing the same name before marriage, his parents were not akin to each other. He was reared to manhood in this township, gaining the education that the country schools afforded in his youth. Farming then became his life work and he now owns a desirable little farm. He is a member of the Democratic party. In 1850, he and Emily Jones, a native of Brown County, were made one by the holy bonds of matrimony, and their home has been cheered with three children—Mollie, Hattie and Albert.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 13.

ELLIS, John E. of Pleasant Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

John E. Ellis, farmer, P.O. Georgetown, was born in Pleasant Township May 24, 1817; the son of Noah and Margaret (Evans) Ellis, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, his parentage being Irish; hers Scotch and Irish. Noah was in the war of 1812. John E. was reared in the country and received the limited education his neighborhood afforded. He adopted farming as his life pursuit, and has made a success of it. In 1837, he was married to Mary Wright, born in 1818, the daughter of Robert and Lydia (Waters) Wright. Her father was of Irish; her mother of Dutch extraction. Their children are Samuel, Lydia (wife of Samuel Burris, of Clark Township), Matilda, Arminda (wife of Matthew Dooley), G.L., Sally May (wife of Henry Andrews), Margaret A. (wife of William Page), Charles and Alcinda Isolina Douraman Devargus Dust. This rather remarkable name of the youngest child has this origin. Her eldest brother had been on a visit to Pike's Peak and out west met a young lady, Alcinda Dust, to whom he became greatly attached. On his return, he wanted his baby sister named after her, but his father had seen an American heroine, so good and kind to disabled soldiers that he wished to perpetuate her name in his family. They compromised the matter by giving her both names. The family is noted for great physical development. The average weight of the children exceeds two hundred pounds; three of the girls have a combined weight of 647 pounds, while the young lady, who revels in the quintuple given name, now a blooming lass of twenty summers, tips the scales at something over 200 pounds. Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are members of the Union Church. He is a Democrat.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 12.

ELLIS, John W. of Lewis Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

John W. Ellis, farmer, P.O. Higginsport. Of Abraham F. Ellis' children, John W. is the fifth, and eldest now living. He was born January 26, 1822, in Brown County, Ohio, and was raised in Lewis Township, where his entire life has been devoted to farming. He received the benefits of the common schools and remained at home until 1851, when he married Almira Burton, and the same year settled where he now lives. In 1852, he buried his wife, at the age of twenty years, she leaving one infant daughter, viz., Almira. Mr. Ellis subsequently married Margaret Martin, to whom have been born two daughters, viz., Lellie M. and Viddie M. Both of Mr. Ellis' companions were daughters of early pioneer families of Brown County. He owns 124 acres of land, under good cultivation. This he has taken mostly from an unbroken forest. His crops are wheat, corn and tobacco; of the latter he raises annually about four acres. His political affiliations have ever been with the Democratic party, which has intrusted to his honor and judgment the office of Township Assessor two terms, and Clark one.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 100.

ELLIS, S.W. of Lewis Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

S.W. Ellis, farmer, P.O. Feesburg. This name we find to be of Scotch extraction. S.W. is the son of Squire Abraham F. Ellis, and a grandson of Samuel Ellis. Of the latter and his four brothers, mention is made in the body of this volume mostly in Pleasant Township. A.F. Ellis was born in Virginia, in 1791, but from five years of age, grew to maturity in what is now Brown County, Ohio. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Amos and Mary Ellis, December 24, 1813. They first settled near the present Sink Creek Schoolhouse, where they lived until about 1822, when he purchased 100 acres of land in Lewis Township, R.K. Mead's Survey, No. 1661. In this vicinity, he lived for many years, and died May 27, 1862. He was a patriot in the war of 1812, and during life became a man of opulence; owning broad acres, and serving a number of years as Justice of Peace. He was a man of medium height, heavy set, square shouldered and possessed of a strong constitution, which enabled him to withstand many pioneer difficulties. He began to clear his farm in Lewis Township, with but little assistance, as his children were either girls or small boys. Early in his settlement in Lewis Township, he carried on coopering and furnished the pioneers with pork, flour and whisky barrels. Though he never learned the trade under instruction, he made a good barrel. It is said of him that when a youth of seventeen, he encountered and killed the last bear seen in Pleasant Township. Mrs. Ellis was about four years her husband's junior, and died August 3, 1866. They were both members of the Church of the Disciples, in which faith they died. Their children were twelve in number, viz.: Perry Q., Mary, Indiana, Minerva, John W., Eliza A., Samuel W., William P., Matilda, Abraham M., Elizabeth J. and Warren W. Of the twelve, seven are now living. The subject of this sketch is the seventh child; he was born January 26, 1826, in Lewis Township. He was raised to farm life, and obtained a common school education. He remained at home with his father until August 7, 1851, when he married Helen M. Norris, of a pioneer family of Lewis Township. Her birth, dates July 1, 1834. To this union have been given two daughters, viz.: Jennie N. Croswell and Mary Bell, wife of Charles G. Thompson. Mr. Ellis has always been a resident of Lewis Township, and now owns a farm of 129 3/4 acres, which is well improved and under good cultivation. He is one of the well to do citizens, and is interested in the cause of education, having prepared both of his daughters for teaching, in which profession both have served.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 100-101.

ELLIS, W.P. of Lewis Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

W.P. Ellis, farmer, P.O. Higginsport, son of Abraham F. Ellis, whose history appears in this volume, is the ninth child, and was born in 1830, in Lewis Township, where he was raised to farm life, and acquired a common school education. He remained at home until 1857, when he married, Jane Slack, who was born in Brown County, Ohio, June 30, 1836. The result of this union is six boys, all now living. Mr. Ellis can say what few men of his age can, and that is, that during his entire life, he has lived on the farm of his birth, and now owns a part of it. He and his sons devote considerable time to the raising of tobacco. Politically, he has always been and is yet a Democrat. He and wife adhere to the Christian Church.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 101.

ELLIS, Warren W.

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Warren W. Ellis, carpenter, Ripley, is the twelfth child of Abraham F. Ellis, who is mentioned under Samuel E. Ellis' sketch in Lewis Township. Warren was born December 4, 1838, in Lewis Township, where he was raised to farm life, and received the benefits of the common schools. He remained at home until twenty-four year of age, when he married Mary C., an adopted daughter of Milford and Elizabeth McConnell. Warren and his wife took up their home on the old homestead with his widowed mother and two maiden sisters, there to remain as one family until the widow's death, elsewhere given. In the fall of 1866, he purchased the Gelena Hotel in Higginsport, which he kept one year, subsequently removed to Ripley, and finally to his present residence, three miles north of Ripley, on the original McConnell homestead. He and wife are the parents of two children. Since his marriage, he has devoted most of his time to carpentering. While a resident of Lewis Township, he served one term as Township Trustee. He is deeply interested in the cause of education, and is making an effort to place in the possession of his children that which can never be stolen from them, and which they can always profitably use.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 101.

ELLSBERRY, Enoch Matson

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

Dr. Enoch Matson Ellsberry was born in Tennessee December 29, 1797, one year after the admission of the State into the Union. When a boy, his parents emigrated to the State of Kentucky, and settled near Paris. Seven years later, or about the year 1810, they removed to Ohio, and settled at Bethel, Clermont County. Until he was sixteen years old, his habits and occupation were those of a farmer, but at that age, having profited by the slender advantages of the times for a good education, he became a teacher and a successful instructor. Unsatisfied with so unambitious a field and its unprofitable compensation, he left it at the age of twenty-one to begin the study of medicine in the office of Drs. Wayland & Hopkins, two eminent physicians of the day. After a thorough course of study, he opened an office in Bethel and commenced the practice, which was interrupted in 1822 by his marriage with Miss Eunice Morris, a daughter of Judge John Morris, of Tate Township, Clermont County, and a niece of the late distinguished Senator Tom Morris, who made his name famous by introducing in the Senate of the United States the first petition urging the non-extension of domestic slavery in the new States and Territories. The issue of this marriage were five sons and three daughters. John Rush Ellsberry was the oldest, and a physician whose promise of usefulness was broken by the decree of death. Isaac N. Ellsberry, like his eldest brother, died young, just when he was at the threshold of a brilliant career at the bar. Thomas Ellsberry, who was a farmer, died at the age of thirty-three. Dr. W. W. Ellsberry, like his oldest brother, embraced the profession of medicine, and by his splendid talents and devotion to his chosen art has won for himself an enviable position. Benjamin, the youngest son, is a prominent business man, who, by tact and indomitable perseverance, has made a name in the business world. Dr. Enoch Ellsberry died November 25, 1852, leaving behind him a name untarnished by a breath of reproach. He was once a Democratic nominee for Congress, but was defeated by his Whig opponent.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 641.

ETIENNE, Joseph Mair of Perry Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Joseph Mair Etienne (deceased), son of Joseph and Margaret (Barber) Mair Etienne, was born in Lorraine, France, in 1811. In 1830, he came to this country. He was a tailor by trade, and worked as journeyman in different cities through the Eastern and Western States. In the spring of 1840, he opened a general store in Vincennes, Ind., which he kept three years. He was married there in 1842 to Mary Gomean, born in Lorraine, France. They had five children, two living—Joseph and Elizabeth. In 1843, they came to this township and opened a general store near where the family now reside. They continued the business very successfully, and were well liked by the people. In 1874, they closed, as their family were married and left home. Mr. Mair Etienne died March 3, 1881, since which time his widow has resided on the homestead. The family are all members of the Catholic Church.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 135.

ETIENNE, Joseph Mair of Perry Township

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Joseph Mair Etiennem farmer, P.O. Vera Cruz, son of Joseph and Mary Mair Etienne, was born in this township, on the farm where he now lives, April 25, 1846. He was reared on the farm, and was married in this township to Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Work, born in Clermont County, Ohio. They have two children, born in this township—Mary, born December 9, 1874, and Frances, born December 29, 1880. Joseph now owns fifty-eight acres of the homestead, on which has has built a fine house. Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 135.

EVANS, Duncan

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

Duncan Evans, farmer, P.O. Higginsport, was born in 1826, and raised in Pleasant Township, this county. His father, John B. Evans, was born in Kentucky in 1800, and in 1801 came with his parents to this township, settling four miles south of Georgetown, where he was raised and spent his life as a farmer. John B. was married, in 1823, to Sarah Moore, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Jonathan Moore, who emigrated to Brown County in 1805. Of their ten children seven are now living, five in Pleasant Township, one in Lewis Township, and one a physician in Colorado. Duncan is living on the old place; he learned the blacksmith trade in early life, and worked at it six years. In 1850, he was married to Mary A. Martin, a native of Brown County. She was born in 1832, and is a daughter of Samuel Martin. They have had eleven children, of whom the following survive: Emma F. (wife of J.J. Warner), Louella, Charlie, Sallie, Mollie and Jennie D.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 15.

EVANS, J.H.

submitted by Yolanda Campbell Lifter

J.H. Evans, farmer, P.O. Ripley, was born on the old Evans homestead, in Huntington Township, February 15, 1854, and is a son of the Hon. Andrew Evans, of whom mention is made in the biographical department of Huntington Township. He was reared on the farm, and in the district schools received a good, practical education. He remained at the old home until his twenty-second birthday, February 15, 1876, at which time he was married to Miss Louisa B., the daughter of Samuel Dragoo (a son of Samuel Dragoo, old settler). After his marriage, he remained one year on the home farm, when he removed to his present place of residence. He owns 269 acres of well improved and highly cultivated land. He and his wife are members of the Huntington Presbyterian Church, to which they have been connected for some time. He is also a member of the I.O.O.F., Union Lodge of Ripley, No. 118. They have three children, namely—Charles P., Ross H. and Archie L. Mrs. Evas was born March 22, 1857, in Union Township.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 62.

EYLER, Carey C.

submitted by Lorraine Hatfield

Carey C. Eyler, farmer, P.O. Fincastle, was born in March 1838 in Eagle Township. His parents were Henry and Mary Eyler. He was reared to man's estate on a farm, and received a fair English education. In December, 1861, he married Mary E., daughter of Joseph and Melsena Rees. They have five living children, viz.: Amos L., Joseph C., Henry W., Inez W. and Wellington R. Mr. Eyler has served as Land Appraiser of Eagle Township, also as Treasurer. He is the owner of 100 acres of land in the northern portion of the township.

The History of Brown County, Ohio Containing A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of Brown County; Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters, Etc., Etc. (Chicago: W.H. Beers & Co., 1883), 225.

Brown County, Ohio

Yolanda Campbell Lifter, Brown County Coordinator

Copyright 2005-2010 Yolanda Campbell Lifter
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